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Veerle Ritstier

Creativity runs through Veerle’s veins. In her younger years she tried a lot of different techniques: painting, textile, sculpting, weaving, et cetera. Why would you choose if you have so many favourite options? At the age of fourteen, she exhibits her work in the textile museum. She also enters the competition ‘The comic of your life’ which results in her story being exhibited at the Maritime Museum. Her parents take her on regular visits to museums and art fairs and fill the entire house with colourful artworks. She is fully convinced to become an artist.

During her four years at the Academy of Arts textile becomes her focal point. By hand, she sews eighteen unique works. These textile sculptures form a group carrying the family name ‘Doda’. On the side, she starts making etchings. After the decease of her mother, during the third year of her educational training, she uses this technique to make a commemorative portrait of her. Veerle graduates with her Doda family project. Each Doda is documented with its source of inspiration in an artist book which is part of the presentation.

After graduating, Veerle made a couple of Doda’s on commission. However, her interest in painting, photography, and sculpting slowly starts to grow. In using these media she focuses on giving shape to quantum physic abstractions. Her work varies from zooming in on matter and metamorphoses to the merging of user and object. Essentially the conviction that ‘all is one’ lies at the heart of Veerle’s work. Humans are no exception, which can be seen in the series Theatrum, because we are one with everything around us. Lately her focus switched to sculpting. She crafts highly detailed pieces where (human)  anatomy and natural elements merge into surreal environments.

Veerle working on two different artworks. Oneness above, Theatrum I beneath.

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